Missouri Family Group Sheet for the Jessie T. Maddox Family

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Copyright Sherry Wray. All rights reserved.
http://www.fgs-project.com/copyright.html
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Submitted by: Sherry Wray
Email address: <Sherrywray@aol.com>

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Husband: Jessie T. Maddox
Birth date: abt 1799
Birthplace: Virginia
Death date: 10 Aug 1861
Place of death: Montevallo Twp, Vernon County, MO
Burial:
Father:
Mother:

Marriage date: abt 1823
Marriage place: Virginia or Tennessee

Wife: Lucinda Ann
Birth date: abt 1799
Birthplace: Virginia
Death date: 16 Oct 1875
Place of death: Vernon County, MO.
Burial:
Father:
Mother:

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CHILDREN
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Child No. 1: Elizabeth Ann (Betsy)
Sex: f
Birth date: 1824
Birthplace: Tennessee
Death date: after 1915
Place of death: Vernon County, Sheldon, MO
Burial: probaby Toalson Cemetery
Marriage date: abut 1848
Marriage place:
Spouse's name: Robert Marion Curry
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Child No. 2: Wilson C
Sex: m
Birth date: abt 1821
Birthplace: Tennessee
Death date: 20 Feb 1865
Place of death: Vernon County, MO
Burial:
Marriage date: 14 Oct 1844
Marriage place: Monroe County, MO
Spouse's name: Mary Ann Head
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Child No. 3: George Anthony
Sex: m
Birth date: abt 1829
Birthplace: Tennessee
Death date:
Place of death:
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:
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Child No. 4: Martha Jane
Sex: f
Birth date: abt 1831
Birthplace: Tennessee
Death date:
Place of death:
Burial:
Marriage date: 9 Mar 1857
Marriage place: Monroe County, MO
Spouse's name: Thomas E. Willis
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Child No. 5: Josephus
Sex: m
Birth date: abt 1831
Birthplace: Tennessee
Death date:
Place of death:
Marriage date:
Burial:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:
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Child No. 6: Sarah D
Sex: f
Birth date: abt 1833
Birthplace: Tennessee
Death date:
Place of death:
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:
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Child No. 7: Ezekiel S.
Sex: m
Birth date: abt 1836
Birthplace: Illinois
Death date:
Place of death:
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:
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Child No. 8: William T
Sex: m
Birth date: abt 1838
Birthplace: Illinois
Death date: before Jul 1869
Place of death: Vernon Co. MO
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:
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Child No. 9: John Stuart
Sex: m
Birth date: abt 1841
Birthplace: Illinois
Death date: 20 Feb 1865
Place of death: Vernon Co., MO
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:
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Documentation: Census RecordsTHE FAMILY OF JESSE T. MADDOX OF VERNON
COUNTY, MISSOURI by Ron Brothers
Perhaps Vernon County was to be the hope of final settlement for the Maddox family in their trek across the Midwest. The coming events of the Civil War, unknown to them, would devastate the family beyond their wildest dreams.
Jesse Maddox appears in the HISTORY OF VERNON COUNTY as being a member of the grand jury which passed an indictment against John Brown, the antislavery activist, on May 9, 1859. Jesse would not live long enough to see the horrors of war that his family would experience. Land records show the death of Jesse to be 10 August 1861. In the same book, Jesse's brothers Wilson and William Maddox appear among the citizenry in the account of a battle fought April 13, 1862 in the town of Montevallo against a troop of Union soldiers sent there to round up Southern sympathizers. Wilson is alluded to as the "hotel keeper" and one of the organizers of the Confederate attack. This small town would be wiped off the face of the earth before the end of the civil war from this and subsequent raids by the Union army only to be relocated and rebuilt after the war a short distance from its' original founding.
In the probate records of Jesse Maddox, a deed selling a large portion of the original homestead, cites a graveyard containing an acre of land, then being used, will be reserved and exempt from the sale. The grave site has been rediscovered in a field about 1/2 mile off the road by this author and contains six unmarked graves and one marked grave with the headstone name of Austin. Since the death of Jesse, his son William T., and his son-in-law Robert Marian Curry are prior to the date of sale of this land it is safe to assume that they are buried in this cemetery since it was part of their lands. This site had long been forgotten and is not recorded in the cemetery records of the county, nor has it been mentioned in any subsequent deeds thereafter. One of the graves is very prominent and is outlined by several large stones around its perimeter.
It is definitely an adult grave and probably that of Jesse Maddox. (the Dillon Cemetery, called Batts Cemetery in the Cemetery Directory).
Etta Mae Maddox Bramlett told that her grandfather John Stuart Maddox joined the Confederate Army in Missouri. He later learned of the birth of his son Ben Stuart Maddox (Jan. 1861 or 1862) and deserted to return home to see his first son. A squad was sent after him and he eluded them by clinging to a fallen log across a creek near the family home. He later returned to his company. At the end of the war he was returning home from Kansas with another man and was ambushed by Jay hawkers and shot dead in a field. The friend fell to the ground to pretend dead hoping the raiders would leave. The field was set ablaze by the attackers and the friend escaped in the smoke. The story goes on to say that the friend returned later and buried John Maddox in the field some distance from his home. Etta also tells that all of the male members of the Maddox family were killed in the Civil War. She did not know of the existence of three other sons, George Anthony Maddox, Josephus Maddox and Ezekiel S. Maddox who did survive the war.
Probate records are available for Jesse, William T., and John S. Maddox in Vernon County but none list the actual date nor the cause of death of any of the three. However, the date of death of John Stuart Maddox and Wilson C. Maddox was found in an affidavit attached to a land deed of Robert Sykes (Book G, Page 64) and in Vernon County Circuit Court Records of Pigg Vs. Lucy Ann Reed May 1877. According to these sources both John and Wilson died on 20 February 1865. There was no cause listed. It is interesting to note that the two brothers died on the same day and would lead one to speculate that they were involved in a battle or skirmish of some kind. History records a skirmish at Centre Creek, Missouri on this date but information concerning that battle has not been researched at this time. There are no known burial records of any of the male members of this family in Vernon County.
The family farm was attacked at some unknown date by what Etta called Kansas Jay hawkers and the two story log house was burned. Order No. 11, the infamous Union condemnation to burn the homes of western Missouri county residents, may have been the cause of their flight from the county. Lucy Ann Maddox Reed was allowed to carry a tea set and table utensils away from the family farm by the attackers. Etta told, that Mary Jane, Lucy Ann, along with the wife of John Stuart Maddox, Martha Jane, and her son Ben Stuart Maddox, were put on a boat and sent down the Mississippi River. This could not be so, as the Mississippi was many days travel from the farm and no tributaries ran through the county.
They may indeed have ended up in New Orleans as Etta told, and it is likely they did, but not in the manner Etta described. Etta maintained that in New Orleans, they somehow met Tiford M. Reed, who fell in love with Lucy Ann Maddox. Tilford sent the four to Lamar County, Texas to stay with "Grandpa Hull". After the war, Tiford escorted the family back to Vernon County, Missouri where he married Lucy 13 November 1866. He bought property there in 1868 and then he and Lucy moved back to Lamar County before the 1880 census and then to Choctaw County, Oklahoma after 1900.
An old family story was that all first born male children should be named Stuart because of a pact made when the Stuarts married into the Maddox family. There is no known marriage record proving this. The marriage of Jesse Maddox has not been located and the last name of his wife Lucinda
Ann is unknown. She could have been the Stuart connection. It is a
fact, however that descendants of Jesse have been named Stuart, i.e. John Stuart, Ben Stuart, Jesse Stuart, Travis Stuart, Don Stuart, as well as some of the Curry family who used the middle initial S.
by Ron Brothers Sherman, TX. (In 1998 he lives in Paris, TX.)
The above was excerpted from a longer account.
Additional information secured from Ron Brothers:
According to the History of Vernon County Missouri dated 1887, John Brown's men raided and robbed the homes of two Vernon County residents on December 21, 1858. The whole county was paranoid and jittery over the events of the times, there were pleas for federal troops and state militia to the governor and state legislature. Many residents moved away, especially those close to the Kansas border. In May 1859 the circuit court convened and on the 9th a grand jury, composed of R.A.
Broughan forman, A.B. Howard, James Wilson, Lewis C. Jones, Wm. Gabbard, JESSE MADDOX, Wm. Brim, James Moore, John B. Eidson, Eli Phillips, Hazel P. Mobley, Matthew Armstrong, J.D. Wilson, Wm. Pryor, Peter Duncan, and M.P. Woodruff, found true bills of indictment for murder and robbery against John Brown and the other raiders who were known by name, and also their Confederates whose names were unknown. Nothing ever came of the indictment and no one was ever arrested. A few months later Brown was captured on Oct. 16, 1859 for his raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia.
A popular song taught to school children was that of : "John Brown's body lies a mouldering in his grave...Glory, Glory, Hallelujah.....his soul goes marching on. It was sung as a rounder like Row, Row, Row your boat.
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1830 Census Jessee Maddox living in Carter County, Tennessee
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1840 Census Maddox's lived in Macoupin Co., Il p42, T5 Roll 20 - There are no land records recorded for Jesse in this county. There is a Benjamin Maddox recorded as a Revolutionary War Veteran on a pylon with others in the courtyard of the Macoupin County Courthouse, Illinois.
This Benjamin is also buried in the county. There is no established relationship to Jesse Maddox at this time.
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1850 Census Monroe Co. MO. District #59 Family # 391 Name was spelled Mattox. On July 23, 1845 Jesse Maddox buys 36 acres from Charles Burton.
He gave land to the Christian Church, which no longer exists there, on November 27, 1845. The Maddox family was Methodist and later became Baptist, and there is no members of the Christian Church within memory of anyone.
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1860 Census Vernon Co., MO Montevallo Twp.
MADDOX, Joseph 29y Farmer Indiana
Mary 25y Indiana
James F. 6y MO
Charles W. 4y MO
Jesse R. 3y Mo
Lucy 2 mo. MO
next door
MADDOX, Jesse 61y Farmer VA (died 1 year later) Lucindann 61y VA
E.S. 24y Farming IL
John S. 19y Farming IL
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*****
Jesse Maddox was a farmer as shown on the 1860 census. US General Land Office records land grants to Jesse Maddox, Wilson C. Maddox, William T.
Maddox, Robert M. Curry and John Curry, all 160 acres of land adjoining each other, in July 1860, in Vernon County, Missouri, Section 22, Twp 34, Range 30, about 6 miles east of Sheldon, Missouri. The first recorded land deed of the family in Vernon County is that of Wilson Maddox in June
1858 where he buys a plot in the town of Montevallo. Jesse's first record is January 1859, and John Stuart Maddox, another son, buys land from his brother Wilson C. Maddox in March of 1859. While the Curry and Maddox families migrated to Vernon County, Missouri, one of Jesse's sons, George Anthony, stayed in Monroe County, Missouri for a while, then is found in Page County, Iowa in 1865 and in 1870 in Yamhill County, Oregon.
1866 Probate Records dated January 23, his wife Lucy and daughter Elizabeth Curry give up their right to administration of the Estate of Jesse Maddox.
Many books written about the Border Wars show it raged for over a year before the Civil War erupted.THE FAMILY OF JESSE T. MADDOX OF VERNON COUNTY, MISSOURI author Ron Brothers of Sherman, Texas Perhaps Vernon County was to be the hope of final settlement for the Maddox family in their trek across the Midwest. The coming events of the Civil War, unknown to them, would devastate the family beyond their wildest dreams.
Jesse Maddox appears in the HISTORY OF VERNON COUNTY as being a member of the grand jury which passed an indictment against John Brown, the antislavery activist, on May 9, 1859. Jesse would not live long enough to see the horrors of war that his family would experience. Land records show the death of Jesse to be 10 August 1861. In the same book, Jesse's brothers Wilson and William Maddox appear among the citizenry in the account of a battle fought April 13, 1862 in the town of Montevallo against a troop of Union soldiers sent there to round up Southern sympathizers. Wilson is alluded to as the "hotel keeper" and one of the organizers of the Confederate attack. This small town would be wiped off the face of the earth before the end of the civil war from this and subsequent raids by the Union army only to be relocated and rebuilt after the war a short distance from its' original founding.
In the probate records of Jesse Maddox, a deed selling a large portion of the original homestead, cites a graveyard containing an acre of land, then being used, will be reserved and exempt from the sale. The grave site has been rediscovered in a field about 1/2 mile off the road by this author and contains six unmarked graves and one marked grave with the headstone name of Austin. Since the death of Jesse, his son William T., and his son-in-law Robert Marian Curry are prior to the date of sale of this land it is safe to assume that they are buried in this cemetery since it was part of their lands. This site had long been forgotten and is not recorded in the cemetery records of the county, nor has it been mentioned in any subsequent deeds thereafter. One of the graves is very prominent and is outlined by several large stones around its perimeter.
It is definitely an adult grave and probably that of Jesse Maddox. (the Dillon Cemetery, called Batts Cemetery in the Cemetery Directory).
Etta Mae Maddox Bramlett told that her grandfather John Stuart Maddox joined the Confederate Army in Missouri. He later learned of the birth of his son Ben Stuart Maddox (Jan. 1861 or 1862) and deserted to return home to see his first son. A squad was sent after him and he eluded them by clinging to a fallen log across a creek near the family home. He later returned to his company. At the end of the war he was returning home from Kansas with another man and was ambushed by Jay hawkers and shot dead in a field. The friend fell to the ground to pretend dead hoping the raiders would leave. The field was set ablaze by the attackers and the friend escaped in the smoke. The story goes on to say that the friend returned later and buried John Maddox in the field some distance from his home. Etta also tells that all of the male members of the Maddox family were killed in the Civil War. She did not know of the existence of three other sons, George Anthony Maddox, Josephus Maddox and Ezekiel S. Maddox who did survive the war.
Probate records are available for Jesse, William T., and John S. Maddox in Vernon County but none list the actual date nor the cause of death of any of the three. However, the date of death of John Stuart Maddox and Wilson C. Maddox was found in an affidavit attached to a land deed of Robert Sykes (Book G, Page 64) and in Vernon County Circuit Court Records of Pigg Vs. Lucy Ann Reed May 1877. According to these sources both John and Wilson died on 20 February 1865. There was no cause listed. It is interesting to note that the two brothers died on the same day and would lead one to speculate that they were involved in a battle or skirmish of some kind. History records a skirmish at Centre Creek, Missouri on this date but information concerning that battle has not been researched at this time. There are no known burial records of any of the male members of this family in Vernon County.
The family farm was attacked at some unknown date by what Etta called Kansas Jay hawkers and the two story log house was burned. Order No. 11, the infamous Union condemnation to burn the homes of western Missouri county residents, may have been the cause of their flight from the county. Lucy Ann Maddox Reed was allowed to carry a tea set and table utensils away from the family farm by the attackers. Etta told, that Mary Jane, Lucy Ann, along with the wife of John Stuart Maddox, Martha Jane, and her son Ben Stuart Maddox, were put on a boat and sent down the Mississippi River. This could not be so, as the Mississippi was many days travel from the farm and no tributaries ran through the county.
They may indeed have ended up in New Orleans as Etta told, and it is likely they did, but not in the manner Etta described. Etta maintained that in New Orleans, they somehow met Tiford M. Reed, who fell in love with Lucy Ann Maddox. Tilford sent the four to Lamar County, Texas to stay with "Grandpa Hull". After the war, Tiford escorted the family back to Vernon County, Missouri where he married Lucy 13 November 1866. He bought property there in 1868 and then he and Lucy moved back to Lamar County before the 1880 census and then to Choctaw County, Oklahoma after 1900.
An old family story was that all first born male children should be named Stuart because of a pact made when the Stuarts married into the Maddox family. There is no known marriage record proving this. The marriage of Jesse Maddox has not been located and the last name of his wife Lucinda
Ann is unknown. She could have been the Stuart connection. It is a
fact, however that descendants of Jesse have been named Stuart, i.e. John Stuart, Ben Stuart, Jesse Stuart, Travis Stuart, Don Stuart, as well as some of the Curry family who used the middle initial S.
by Ron Brothers Sherman, TX. (In 1998 he lives in Paris, TX.)
The above was excerpted from a longer account.
Additional information secured from Ron Brothers:
According to the History of Vernon County Missouri dated 1887, John Brown's men raided and robbed the homes of two Vernon County residents on December 21, 1858. The whole county was paranoid and jittery over the events of the times, there were pleas for federal troops and state militia to the governor and state legislature. Many residents moved away, especially those close to the Kansas border. In May 1859 the circuit court convened and on the 9th a grand jury, composed of R.A.
Broughan forman, A.B. Howard, James Wilson, Lewis C. Jones, Wm. Gabbard, JESSE MADDOX, Wm. Brim, James Moore, John B. Eidson, Eli Phillips, Hazel P. Mobley, Matthew Armstrong, J.D. Wilson, Wm. Pryor, Peter Duncan, and M.P. Woodruff, found true bills of indictment for murder and robbery against John Brown and the other raiders who were known by name, and also their Confederates whose names were unknown. Nothing ever came of the indictment and no one was ever arrested. A few months later Brown was captured on Oct. 16, 1859 for his raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia.
A popular song taught to school children was that of : "John Brown's body lies a mouldering in his grave...Glory, Glory, Hallelujah.....his soul goes marching on. It was sung as a rounder like Row, Row, Row your boat.
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**
1830 Census Jessee Maddox living in Carter County, Tennessee
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***
1840 Census Maddox's lived in Macoupin Co., Il p42, T5 Roll 20 - There are no land records recorded for Jesse in this county. There is a Benjamin Maddox recorded as a Revolutionary War Veteran on a pylon with others in the courtyard of the Macoupin County Courthouse, Illinois.
This Benjamin is also buried in the county. There is no established relationship to Jesse Maddox at this time.
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*
1850 Census Monroe Co. MO. District #59 Family # 391 Name was spelled Mattox. On July 23, 1845 Jesse Maddox buys 36 acres from Charles Burton.
He gave land to the Christian Church, which no longer exists there, on November 27, 1845. The Maddox family was Methodist and later became Baptist, and there is no members of the Christian Church within memory of anyone.
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****
1860 Census Vernon Co., MO Montevallo Twp.
MADDOX, Joseph 29y Farmer Indiana
Mary 25y Indiana
James F. 6y MO
Charles W. 4y MO
Jesse R. 3y Mo
Lucy 2 mo. MO
next door
MADDOX, Jesse 61y Farmer VA (died 1 year later) Lucindann 61y VA
E.S. 24y Farming IL
John S. 19y Farming IL
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*****
Jesse Maddox was a farmer as shown on the 1860 census. US General Land Office records land grants to Jesse Maddox, Wilson C. Maddox, William T.
Maddox, Robert M. Curry and John Curry, all 160 acres of land adjoining each other, in July 1860, in Vernon County, Missouri, Section 22, Twp 34, Range 30, about 6 miles east of Sheldon, Missouri. The first recorded land deed of the family in Vernon County is that of Wilson Maddox in June
1858 where he buys a plot in the town of Montevallo. Jesse's first record is January 1859, and John Stuart Maddox, another son, buys land from his brother Wilson C. Maddox in March of 1859. While the Curry and Maddox families migrated to Vernon County, Missouri, one of Jesse's sons, George Anthony, stayed in Monroe County, Missouri for a while, then is found in Page County, Iowa in 1865 and in 1870 in Yamhill County, Oregon.
1866 Probate Records dated January 23, his wife Lucy and daughter Elizabeth Curry give up their right to administration of the Estate of Jesse Maddox.
Many books written about the Border Wars show it raged for over a year before the Civil War erupted. .