Kentucky Family Group Sheet for the Lucius Powhatan LITTLE Family


Husband: Lucius Powhatan LITTLE
Birthdate: 2/15/1838
Birthplace: Kentucky
Death date: 12/31/1918
Place of death: Owensboro, KY
Burial:
Father: Douglass LITTLE
Mother: Martha Ann Wright

Marriage date: abt 1875
Marriage place: Ky

Wife: Louise Addison HOLLOWAY
Birthdate: 1852
Birthplace: Ky
Death date: 1887
Place of death: Ky
Burial:
Father:
Mother:

CHILDREN

Child No. 1: Elizabeth Ellouise LITTLE
Sex: f
Birthdate: 10/2/1876
Birthplace: Ky
Death date:
Place of death:
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:

Child No. 2: John Gordon Holloway LITTLE
Sex: m
Birthdate: 6/2/1879
Birthplace: Ky
Death date:
Place of death:
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name:

Child No. 3: Laura Simmons LITTLE
Sex: f
Birthdate: 6/11/1883
Birthplace: Owensboro Ky
Death date:
Place of death: DAR regent per Capt Little
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse's name: Bright Hawes
 
 
Documentation:
* Sources shared by cousins and descendants of Captain George Little
* Census records,
* Newspapers,
* Photos
* http://www.genealogy.com/users/c/o/c/Lorena-Cochran/PHOTO/0026photo.html [no longer extant]
* http://www.hometown.aol.com/spiritwalkintall/page22.html. [no longer extant]
* Transcription: Lucius P. Little.
The distinctions of an able and learned lawyer, a courageous and public spirited citizen, a leader both in thought and action were well merited by Lucius P. Little of Owensboro. He was born on his father's farm in the southern part of Daviess County, February 15, 1838, and died at his home in Owensboro December 31, 1918, when nearing his eighty-first birthday. He was the oldest of the seven children of Douglass and Martha Ann (Wright) Little. His grandfather, George Little, was a native of Scotland, born in 1735, came to the United States in Colonial times, and his first known residence was at Newberry, South Carolina. He served as a private in the Continental line during the Revolutionary war, and while the record of his service is not complete it is known that he was severely wounded in battle, leaving him a cripple. He married his first wife in South Carolina, and was the father of two sons, Jonas and John Little. Soon after the death of his wife he brought his two sons from South Carolina to Kentucky in 1802, first locating in Barren County. His son John subsequently became disatisfied and removed to Tennessee, where he lived for many years and spent his last days in Texas. George Little and his son Jonas remained in Barren County only three years and then removed to what was then Ohio County, locating in that portion which afterward became a part of Daviess County. George Little, the pioneer, attained a ripe old age and passed away in 1815. After coming to Kentucky he married the widow of Alexander Douglass. Her maiden name was Mary Hadley. She had come with her first husband to Kentucky from South Carolina. Her daughter Betsey Douglass became the wife of Jonas Little. Douglass Little, son of George and Mary Hadley Little? was a farmer, blacksmith and wagon maker in early life and in later years became a well trained lawyer. <<<<Transcriber's Notes: all records indicate that the father of Douglass was Betsey and Jonas>>>> He was born in that portion of old Ohio County now Daviess, and died in 1877. For over twenty years he had the responsibilities of such offices as constable, justice of the peace and county judge. Lucius P. Little grew up on a farm, attended the nearby schools of Rumsey and later the schools at the Town of Caolhoun. He achieved a great scope of learning without the aid of a college training. When sixteen years old he became deputy county clerk, and for three years was in the clerk's offices in Daviess and McLean counties. At eighteen he began the study of law, and during 1856-57 attended the law school of the Cumberland Presbyterian University at Lebanon, Tennessee. Admitted to the bar in 1857, he had been in his profession over sixty years when he died. He began practice at Calhoun when in his twentieth year, and remained there until 1860 when he was appointed deputy United States marshal. In that year he was also supervisor of the census of McLean County. The following year he practiced at Louisville, and in 1861 removed to California and for a year was employed in a conveyancer's office. Returning to Kentucky in 1862, he was engaged for a month in recruiting for the Confederate army. The Federals having gained control of the state government, he was apprehended and arrested and endured imprisonment at Bowling Green and later at Frankfort. Effecting his release, he went to Mexico in the fall of 1863, but the following spring returned and soon afterward resumed practice at Calhoun. To his long and distinguished service in the law, he added rare literary attainments, and he is particularly entitled to memory as a contributor to history. Judge Little was author of the bill which passed the Kentucky Legislature and is known as the "Practice Act", now the rule of practice in the courts of the state. He was a member of the Filson Club, the oldest literary club of Kentucky, and also a member of and for over twenty years president of the Investigators Club, the second oldest literary club of the state. He was a Knight Templar Mason and seved as eminent commander of his commandery.
* The following newspaper article about Lucius Powhatan Little and his family is best viewed at
http://www.genealogy.com/users/c/o/c/Lorena-Cochran/PHOTO/0026photo.html [no longer extant] and references his father Douglas, grandfather Jonas, and great grandfather Captain George Little who was in the American Revolution.
* http://ftp.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ky/daviess/photos/documents/darmarke520 gph.txt The article has a few typos, as Mary Hadley was really Mary Handley, but it has some good history on the family coming from Scotland and their position in society.
* Other links referencing the Little families:
http://www.hometown.aol.com/spiritwalkintall/George.html [no longer extant]
http://www.genealogy.com/users/g/e/n/Coonfield-Genealogy/FILE/0004text.txt [no longer extant]
http://files.usgwarchives.net/ky/bullitt/military/civilwar/pensions/little149gmt.txt
* From family story tellers and photos, most of the Littles had black hair and black eyes.
 

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